Finally getting the hang of Instagram

 

I’ve been thinking about tackling Instagram for a while .. because I desperately needed more opportunity not to have to write that much .. if you can believe it!  But because I process photos quite ‘seriously’ on my PC before letting them loose, and because I have a Windows phone which I’m determined to keep until the bitter end .. there just didn’t seem much hope! But recently I did yet another search for alternative ways of uploading to Instagram, and finally I’ve found a way that works .. like a dream! It simply involves installing the free browser Vivaldi on the PC (no need to make it the default browser) and accessing Instagram through that! The extra piece of software doesn’t weigh the computer down like some other methods I’ve tried and failed with. The only drawback is that it only allows me to upload one photo at a time rather than grouped .. but this could change, and personally I prefer that anyway. Here’s the link where I found out about it ..

https://www.techradar.com/uk/how-to/upload-photos-to-instagram-from-a-pc

I’ll be posting on Instagram more regularly than here, I would imagine. WordPress will remain my serious ‘writing’ place, and I’ll be able to elaborate here especially regarding ‘instructional’ content but .. you might have noticed .. I seem to have less and less time to do that these days. Here are some images from the couple of posts I’ve put on Instagram so far .. and if you’re interested, have a look at

https://www.instagram.com/davidmeredithneat/?hl=en

 

Above .. works in progress. Green styrofoam ‘beasts’ shaped in two halves, ready to be sealed to make moulds and casts from, and polyurethane resin cast ‘Arpish Dancers’ which I’m testing on a mock-lacquer sushi plate.

Below .. I recently ‘re-vamped’ some pen drawings from the Thames Foreshore made a few years ago, converting them into transparent ‘layers’, colouring them in Procreate and finishing them in PaintShop Pro. This is ‘Base#1-1’ and below is an enlarged detail from ‘Base#2-1’

Below .. resin cast ‘eggs’ and foamed-PVC ‘twigs’ collection. I’ve given the PVC my usual treatment of ‘graining’ with sandpaper and staining with Spectrum Noir alcohol ink pens, to resemble bone or wood. I’ve surfaced the mat underneath with a laminated digital sketch .. part of my experimentation with different presentations, or ‘contexts’ as I call them, for the ensembles of small sculptural forms.

 

Astrid Baerndal ‘Source of Life’ at the Blyth Gallery: Part 2

 

The Private View of Astrid’s exhibition Source of Life at the Blyth Gallery (Level 5, Sherfield Building, Imperial College London) took place yesterday, and I managed to take some photos, along with contributing to the short introduction. I’ve included my introductory speech here, with a few added comments.

Homage to Ernst Haeckel 2005

detail

Starfish and Sea Urchin 2009

Paper Insects 2007-18

When you look more closely at the work Astrid has chosen to exhibit here you can, dependent on what it is you normally look for in art, appreciate it first of all in terms of its aesthetics. You can admire the quality of the making; you can focus on the variety of materials experimented with; you can engage in the attraction of the forms presented as objects in themselves. Then .. or instead, especially if you’re the kind of person who perhaps goes through life a bit like a detective and so, when you go to an exhibition, you’re more interested in why an artist does what they do and what the implications are in the ‘bigger picture’ .. you may focus on how the forms are presented, what contexts are implied. Are some of them being catalogued; are some being cultured .. are others being manipulated?

Growth 2005

Brood Place 2005

When an artist does this kind of work, how can it not be a comment on a bigger picture .. in this case the total and relentless manipulation of nature, in other words everything ‘us’ and everything that we do. Sometimes I ask myself if we are even capable of just looking at nature, and appreciating it just for what it is, without ‘making something of it’, manipulating it in some way .. whether physically or mentally?

Although I’m no different, I like to think that I can find enough satisfaction in the forms themselves regardless of what they might represent in a bigger ‘conceptual’ picture. I could say that it’s my duty as an ‘abstracted’ .. or better said ‘abstractional’ .. artist to encourage my own kind to appreciate form for itself for just a little while longer before setting about making something of it!

detail from Paper Insects 2007-18

Chrysalis in Cocoon 2009

What appeals to me most about Astrid’s forms is how undoubtedly ‘world of nature’ or ‘realm of organisms’ they are compared to, say, more traditional wildlife studies, and this aspect remains strong however simply represented or ‘abstracted’ they are. What also appeals to me is the difference between this form of ‘biomorphic abstraction’ and what I would call ‘architectural abstraction’ .. straight lines and structures, defined angles .. which, to my mind, is so exclusively human and artificial. Everything here is a homage to the fundamental formal blueprint of the ‘natural’.. and a celebration of how wonderfully varied that can be, even within a fairly strict recipe!

1001 Mutations 2005

detail

A big part of that is the ‘homage to symmetry’. In case you’re not sure, symmetry is a completely natural ‘directive’ or necessity of cellular life .. not a human invention. Nature is so committed to symmetry that it has curiously never managed the ‘bug fix’ needed to prevent the symmetrical pattern of a moth’s wings being detected when camouflaged against tree bark. In our own aesthetics we seem to share the same inability to control it. Most often in ‘Fine Art’ either it’s not used too obviously for fear of being labelled decorative, or it’s overdone .. too florid!

But Astrid not only presents it as a life principal, but also takes advantage of the fact that symmetry is embedded within our most ancient perceptions. Our species has grown up with it .. part of the package of ‘pattern recognition software’ in here. It’s the reason why our ancestors could make out the face of a lion in the undergrowth; the reason why we can see so many different possibilities in an ink-blot, and the reason why in Astrid’s work an insect can so readily be modified to become a face, or a fish, or even a snowflake.

Filigree Insects 2006-7

Mandala 2005-6

Then there’s the making .. the evident care taken to achieve a desired look; the variety of practical skills demonstrated with the different materials. I’m sure I’m not alone in feeling that this craft .. this ‘creation’ .. is also something that can be appreciated as a ‘thing’ in itself .. simply our way of mimicking both the sheer craftiness and the discipline of nature itself. In my view art originated from our attempt to ‘prove ourselves’ to those that we imagined were above us, and what better or more flattering way to do that than mimicking, or making our own versions of, their creations?

In Astrid’s work I can quite comfortably and naturally move from the ‘what’ to the ‘why, or what for’ without having to ‘put on other glasses’ as it were. I mean, in the first place any celebration of obviously natural form nowadays carries with it a message of sorrow for its likely extinction, so I would argue that’s reason and meaning enough.

Paper Insects 2007-18

But more than that .. Astrid’s creative process is often one of taking a simple natural form such as a fruit or vegetable, subjecting it to successive mutations (using both ‘hand’ methods and digital) until it becomes a different organism. That’s not only commenting on evolution (how such variety / diversity has come about) .. it’s also a closer comment on what we’re doing, what we’re capable of and where we might be going.

So I think Astrid’s work strikes a good balance between the ‘what’ (the designs; the forms we’re seeing; the materials and their own physicality; the craftsmanship shown) and the ‘So what?’ (the bigger evolutionary picture, and the big questions all of us should be asking now).

Source of Life continues at the Blyth Gallery / Level 5, Sherfield Building, Imperial College, South Kensington, London (just off Exhibition Road) until Thursday 6th June. Open everyday from 9am – 9pm, admission free.

Astrid Baerndal ‘Source of Life’ at the Blyth Gallery, Imperial College London

I have been invited by my friend Astrid Baerndal to say some words at the Private View of her exhibition Source of Life taking place at the Blyth Gallery, on the Imperial College campus from 29th May – 6th June.

Brood Place 2005

Astrid creates finely crafted objects, most often in series, in a variety of materials, and almost always heavily suggestive of variations in natural form. For many the common source may be a simple fruit or vegetable image, which she then manipulates according to a set method, generating an abundance of likenesses to other things .. often insects, sometimes faces, or occasionally snowflakes. In some ways Astrid’s work is a homage to symmetry, the design principle that is so characteristic of what we recognise as ‘living’, and which even now remains at the heart of our collective aesthetic. Also the manipulative technique itself is like a testament to the wondrous ingenuity of humankind .. how we can take some simple raw material and transform it into something different. But that’s not all that the work has to say. Maybe we are right to be proud of certain aspects of our ability to manipulate nature .. but is there anyone alive who still believes in a happy ending?

Little Fish 2009

Mutation Modules 2005

The exhibition is open to the public 29th May – 6th June, from 9am – 9pm each day. The Private View is from 6-9pm on 31st May, and if you’d like to come to that please download an invitation from http://www.baerndal.eu where you can see more of Astrid’s work. The full location is Blyth Gallery, Level 5, Sherfield Building, Imperial College Campus, South Kensington.

Metamorphosis 2009

from 1001 Mutations 2005

In Hamburg in the 1990’s

..

I’ve just put more of my past work up in the Gallery, partly because I’ve needed to re-think, to revisit the ‘bone’ collection .. but also because the images are in some ways rather seasonal! Here are some excerpts. Whether you celebrate Christmas and New Year, or whether you’re just looking forward to a break and a new start ..

.. I wish you all a heart-warming one!

..

David Neat 'sweetbox' 1996 cast and painted plaster

Sweetbox 1996

..

Detail of 'Pralinenkasten' from the series, 1995

Detail from the Pralinenkasten series, 1995

..

The theme of confectionary seems to have stuck with me in various guises throughout the years ( see also Faim de siècle ). My interest in the sweetbox form of presentation may just have been following up a childhood fascination with the look of sweets or the fact that I was used to arranging small beach-combed objects in old chocolate boxes. For the original Pralinenkasten concept I made wooden carry- cases loaded with all manner of form and colour variations (cast in plaster and wax) and people could ‘pic-n-mix’ from the stock to put together their own ensemble.

..

David Neat 'Natural Selection' 1995

Natural Selection 1995

..

At the time I had been working on cast plaster and wax forms which suggested both sweets and natural forms, and Natural Selection 1995 was a development of this idea intended to emphasize the physical and tactile.

..

David Neat 'Business' from the 'Qualities' edition, 2003 detail

Business Box from the Qualities edition, 2003

..

A few years later I returned to both the sweetbox form and the idea of the bespoke
with the Qualities range (literally ‘quality’ chocolates in that they were inscribed with the
names of qualities desirable for given occasions or purposes). The range included
limited editions for Valentine’s Day, celebration of marriage, graduation and business.
One of the most satisfying parts of the work was formulating a number of ‘chocolate’ paints for the resin-cast forms .. not only the colour of dark, milk or ‘white’ chocolate has to be right but more importantly, the surface quality. Because I’m proficient in eating chocolate I had a fool-proof test .. I knew I’d got it right when I really started to ‘taste’ it in my mind!

..

'Fruitrack' detail 2

Fruitrack 1993

..

Fruitrack was one of the first serious pieces of sculpture I ever attempted, after a number of years painting and drawing. What I sought from sculpture was the chance to progress more systematically, to develop and make systems or kits of components which could comfortably offset the occasional blunder! Of course it was also about creating things which would have more ‘real presence’, at least as I saw it. What I sacrificed though was the chance of quick success .. to this day my sculptural work takes a mind-numbing amount of time! Apart from these general motivations, I really didn’t know what I wanted to ‘sculpt’ .. or rather, I couldn’t choose from the infinite choices of three-dimensional form. Luckily I made the right decision, to start with the simplest things that were inside me .. versions of favourite shapes (some of them more like gestures) which had always been trying to materialise in my two-dimensional work.

..

David Neat 'Sleep' 1995

Sleep 1995

..

Sleep 1995 was one of my ‘interactive sculptures’ and it represented the ‘sand pit’ idea .. the forms were half-buried in a pile of dyed cork granules on the floor and gallery visitors were encouraged to unearth them. The tactile experience was an important part, and the forms were designed to sit comfortably in the hand. I regret being so haphazard in terms of documenting my work at the time .. I only have this detail photo, not a complete view. As for the inspiration for the work .. I was thinking of the rich, dark red chrysalis forms I used to unearth in the garden when I was a child. I thought these were butterflies but I now know they were moths.

..

David Neat 'faim de siecle' collection

Part of the Faim de siècle series, 1999

..

Amongst the artists ‘trademarked’ above are Mark Rothko, Andy Warhol, Damien Hirst, Richard Long, Robert Indiana, Yves Klein and Richard Serra.

The Faim de siècle series was planned around the millennium and featured 100 notable artists of the 20th century in the form of fake confectionery. The system was conceived as a ‘Pic-n-mix’ selection from which the ‘customer’ could choose their favourites and receive them packaged in specially crafted presentation boxes. The regular format was nine to a square box, but there were other options ranging from a small box of three to a ‘Connoisseur’ box of twenty-five.

I had to make my own choice of which ‘100’ to include in the list .. in some respects easy, and in others very difficult. My aim with the whole enterprise was to comment on a number of things .. the commerce of art; its public consumption; the way even the artists themselves fall prey to their ‘trademarks’! The easy part was choosing the 50 or so artists who, whether by critical or public opinion, just have to have their place in the lifeboat. So there’s Picasso, Kandinsky, Mondrian, Pollock, Beuys, Warhol .. for example. But of course I couldn’t help being influenced by a number of artists who may have been teetering on the edge of the ‘100’ but whose work was ripe for caricature in this form!

..

David Neat 'Dreambags' 2000

Dreambags 2000

..

Dreambags was an idea which never really got past the prototype stage, but these occupy a special place in my ‘collection’ partly because I very rarely use blue except when dealing with sky. It’s also one of the ideas I really must take up again! I’m sure others have this too .. there are ideas that just refuse to go away, that patiently stick with us however forgotten, ignored or mistreated they might be. I can think of a few that I’ve had ever since childhood .. one is a response to the phrase ‘living daylights’ for which I imagined brightly coloured, crystalline forms emerging in a summer sky; another was making my own ‘Mr Potato Head’ kit but with insectile features and attachments; and another was this one .. bags for containing dreams, which could be fitted with spirit dispensers to dose them out when needed.

 

Casting materials

I’ve updated prices, suppliers and added proper entries for principal materials in the casting section under Materials above. The ‘quick view’ comparisons page provides an overview for anyone not sure which of the various casting materials to use, while the other pages give more detailed information on the properties of each and how to work with them. Not all are there yet in detail, I am slowly working through them .. but so far the pages include polyurethane resin, polyester resin, polyurethane foam and polymer-modified plaster.

These more detailed pages begin with a summary ‘definition’; outline what the material is best at and not so good for; describe their ‘working life’ i.e. how to use them and how long for, and lastly what they cost and where to get them. At the end is a ‘worklog’ where I can add other bits of information as I have it.

Here is an excerpt from my page dealing with polyurethane foam. It’s the first one in this section to include photos, but I hope to do the same with the others.

Working life

Polyurethane liquids generally have a recommended shelf life of under a year, but I recently made a test with this flexible polyurethane foam bought at the end of 2012  .. so, more than two years old .. and it worked perfectly! For more advice on disregarding ‘shelf life’ have a look at the start of the ‘quick view’ comparisons page in this section.

self-skinning flexible polyurethane foam, old batch still usable

I always write the date or period when I buy materials, plus reminders if anything needs special handling .. as with part ‘B’ of the mixture here which needs to be shaken because the ingredients separate after it has been standing for some time. This is common with resins especially those that are pre-filled. Another thing .. not only common, inevitable .. is that the cap or lid for the ‘hardener’ component (usually part ‘B’) gets stuck because traces of the liquid crystallize. Something which has never failed me so far even with the most stubborn screw-caps is a strip of tough rubber to grip around the cap while turning.

strip of rubber to help unscrewing caps or lids

As with resins, polyurethane foams consist of two component liquids which are mixed together in a set proportion by weight, so having a good digital kitchen scales is essential. With this one from Tiranti the ratio is 2:1 part ‘A’ to part ‘B’. But in addition to being able to weigh accurately one also needs to judge the volume in this case, to be able to dose the right volume of liquid needed to completely fill the mould when it expands.

For example if the expanding foam has to fill a volume of 1,000 cubic centimetres (equivalent to a 10cm cube) and the foam is expected to expand up to 5-6 times its original liquid volume, then dividing 1,000 by for example 4.5 should ensure that the mould is filled, with a little surplus. This gives us close to 222 ml of liquid needed, of which two-thirds of the weight is part ‘A’ and one-third part ‘B’. So let’s say we need 148ml of part ‘A’ and 74ml of part ‘B’. We must now find out what these would weigh. Luckily the SG (specific gravity, written as the weight in grams of 1 cubic centimetre of ml of the substance) is often given on the containers. If not it will be on the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) available online from the manufacturer or supplier. The SG of part ‘A’ of this expanding foam is 1.05 so 148ml would weigh 155.4 grams, and the SG of part ‘B’ is 1.13 so 74ml would weigh 83.62 grams. We need to round these figures off a bit but also adjust them back to a 2:1 ratio .. 156 grams of part ‘A’ to 78 grams of part ‘B’.

Below, I didn’t need to make a specific volume calculation in this case because I was just testing whether the material still functioned normally. I poured an arbitrary amount of part ‘A’ .. 17 grams .. into the cup first, then 10 grams of part ‘B’, a little more than half the amount. I did this because I’ve come to expect that with ‘old’ materials it’s the catalyst that’s most often affected, becoming weaker.

part 'A' polyurethane foam being weighed

polyurethane foam part 'B' added 2:1 by weight

Above, 10 grams of part ‘B’ has been added. It is always important to think ahead when preparing for this work! Make sure that you have all your necessary tools etc. to hand .. i.e. as here, a mixing stick .. so that you don’t have to hunt around for them at short notice. As soon as the part ‘B’ is added it should be quickly stirred in because the reaction will start within a few seconds. If the mixture needs to be decanted into a form mixing should not be more than c. 10 seconds before transferring it. I’ve tried mixing the material directly in the mould form a few times in the past but this has often resulted in an uneven result with parts not properly curing.

2-part polyurethane foaming within 10 minutes

The foam will have fully risen within about 5-10 minutes. Out of interest I calculated exactly how much it had done so in this case. There was 17g of part ‘A’ .. so 17.85ml in volume using the above calculation, and 10g of part ‘B’ being 11.3ml in volume .. altogether 29.15ml. The foam rose to fill the cup with a little more on top so by measuring water in the cup and adding a little I estimated 210ml. So the polyurethane had actually expanded to 7.2 times its original volume! I don’t know whether the increased expansion was due to the age of the material or the fact that I added a touch more part ‘B’ .. but it’s worth experimenting with!

When I bought the foam in 2012 it was for making these forms shown below (I’ve placed an old casting in its mould) .. and I recorded at the time that the polyurethane only expanded 4.5 times its volume. The mould is plaster-jacketed silicone rubber (made a long time ago when I was living in Hamburg and I can’t remember why I used a translucent silicone). The silicone doesn’t need any release agent against the foam but plaster certainly will if you want to keep it clean .. and Vaseline will be fine. The surface of the cast didn’t achieve the smoothness of the mould .. but one shouldn’t expect it to.

form cast in flexible polyurethane foam, showing silicone rubber mould

What this photo shows well is how much polyurethane discolours over time. In this case it was just discolouration though .. after three years exposure the feel of the surface was just the same.

freshly foamed and 3-year old polurethane cast compared

Test 19/12/2012  72g (48g part A to 24g part B) expanded to fill the ‘Koerper’ mould with just a little pushing out of the top, which cut then be cut off. The volume of the ‘Koerper’ form was measured as 325 ml so expansion was 4.5 times (weight to volume). The foam took c. 25mins to reach tack-free curing

5 favorited in July – Institute of Making, Grace Emily Manning, Salao Coboi, Edwina Camm, Casting About

It’s about time that I started a Links page .. because there are so many useful websites or examples of inspirational work I’d like to share .. so I’ve set it up above and hope to add to it whenever I can. Here are the first few entries .. just the first ones that came to mind.

Salao Coboi

Salao Coboi sculpted figures

http://salaocoboishop.tictail.com/

Although the figures produced by ‘Salao Coboi’ reference the familiar from comics and toys, there’s also much about them that’s really quite unique. Salao Coboi means ‘cowboy salon’ and the name was adopted by a Portuguese artist’s collective in 2009, though the figures exhibited from 2011 onwards are largely the work of the group’s co-founder Apolinario Pereira. Although they may look as if they should be small, many were more than a foot high and produced as hand-painted resin casts in limited editions.

 

Institute of Making

Institute of Making

http://www.instituteofmaking.org.uk/

The Institute of Making describes itself as a ‘cross-disciplinary research club for those interested in the made world’, opened in March 2013 and housed in the Engineering faculty of University College London. Full membership of the ‘club’ is only open to UCL students and staff .. but the website, the excellent Materials Library and a variety of talks and workshops are open to the public. This is not all about the search for flexible concrete or transparent aluminium .. recent public masterclasses have included spoon-carving, felt-making, animatronics and ‘low-cost 3D scanning’.

 

Grace Emily Manning

Screenshot from the intro of 'Pupa' by Grace Emily Manning

http://graceemilymanning.co.uk/

I first saw Grace’s work at her BA Performance Design and Practice degree show presentation at Central Saint Martins this year. Her 7.49min stop-motion animation Pupa is what I’d call ‘the genuine article’ .. charming, unpretentious, and really well-made for what it sets out to be, in her words ‘motivated by non-precious childlike creation’ and founded on exploring tactile and material experiences. It’s certainly one of the most glutinous, squashy and fibrous pieces of animation I’ve seen!

 

Edwina Camm

Edwina Camm 'The Tale of Thomas Dudley'

http://www.edwinacammillustration.com/

A couple of years ago, when I was doing my usual sessions on ‘white card’ model-making for film/tv production design students at Wimbledon College of Art, I searched around for some more interesting examples combining model and drawing .. and found exactly what I had been looking for in Edwina’s work! Edwina originally studied film/tv design at Kingston but then went on to do an MA Illustration Authorial Practice at Falmouth. The image above is from her own on-going project ‘The Tale of Thomas Dudley’ for which she combines narrative, 2D illustration and 3D models.

 

Casting About

Richard Arm, Casting About homepage detail

http://www.castingabout.co.uk/Home.html

This useful, well-organized and friendly looking ‘how to’ website .. a ‘dedicated electronic resource for mould-making & casting methods and materials’ .. is the work of Richard Arm, Senior Technician/Lecturer in the School of Art and Design at Nottingham Trent University. It is perfect for anyone looking for a clear introduction or an overview of the creative possibilities.

Making hollow casts in open or ‘closed’ moulds – Part 1

This post follows directly from the last one in which I featured one of the simplest ways of making a complete mould for a puppet head .. making a 2-piece block mould in silicone rubber. At the end of the post I included a couple of photos of a hollow casting using filled polyurethane resin and now I want to explain how to do this in more detail. I will also deal in later posts with making hollow casts using other materials such as Jesmonite and the advantages of being able to make a hollow cast in a ‘closed’ mould .. i.e. without having to set up a pouring hole at the mouldmaking stage.

mould with casting

Jumping forward for the moment above and below, the hollow resin cast is almost finished and just needs a little cleaning up on the seam line. Polyurethane resin normally cures a white-to-beige colour dependent on the type and this cast is light grey because I added a filler called Fillite when mixing it. Fillers are added to resins for many different reasons (see Common fillers for resin casting in the Materials section) but in this case it is specifically to thicken the resin to help it stay put on sloping surfaces. Fillite also makes the resin easier to carve or sand without reducing its strength too much. Unlike polyester resins, there is no thixotropic or ‘gelling’ additive available for polyurethane resins.

casting nearly finished

For this test piece I used Fast Cast Polyurethane Resin from Tomps (see Quick view comparisons of casting materials for current prices) which is particularly thin to begin with, but the slower version has the advantage of a slightly longer working time and the ‘turning’, i.e. when the resin changes from liquid to solid, is not so abrupt. Below is the equipment needed for correct mixing. Polyurethane resins come in two equal parts, almost always mixed 1:1 by weight but in the past I’ve often got by without any problems by judging equal volumes in two disposable plastic cups, even though the weights of the two parts are slightly different. Now that I’m even more grown-up I prefer to measure properly by weight, using a fairly inexpensive kitchen weighing scales. Because the cans or bottles resin comes in are never designed to assist the pouring of small amounts .. the manufacturers would prefer that we use it all up in one go! .. I always decant some of each part into plastic cups and then pour from those when measuring. To avoid knocking these over while working, I made the cup-holder shown out of foamed Pvc.

materials for hollow resin casting

I usually mix Fillite with resin in the proportion 1:2 .. that is, equal amounts by weight of all three parts. This is easiest to remember and it also usually results in a thick sludge which is still easily spreadable and which will still manage to fill fine detail. It’s best to mix the Fillite thoroughly into part ‘A’ of the resin first (which is the ‘resin’ part of most polyurethane brands). The resin will combine with the Fillite surprisingly smoothly, to form a thick paste, which of course becomes thinner and more manageable when part ‘B’, the hardener, is added. Mixing must then be both thorough .. and fast! .. but shouldn’t need more than 30 seconds or so for small amounts like this. I usually mix up 10g part ‘A’, 10g Fillite and then 10g part ‘B’. The best mixing sticks I’ve found are disposable chopsticks because they’re very resilient, clean easily and can be re-used.

mixing Fillite with resin

The best practice is to pour most or all of it into the open mould-half straight away and sway the mould to let the slushy liquid cover the surface naturally first. In my experience it’s rare that air gets trapped with this method and using this mix, but if you’re concerned about deep detail there’s always a bit of time to poke around with a cocktail stick or small brush to make sure air is freed. An alternative is to take the extra time to brush on a thin detail coat all over first and let this firm up before pouring in more. For a few minutes the resin will pool back into the centre, but I work round the mould with a soft but rigid brush (synthetic is good) pulling it back up the sides for as long as I can until it starts to change. I try not to take it over the mould edge i.e. the outline of the form, but it doesn’t matter if this happens because this line can be cleaned up before the resin is fully hardened. Obviously, with the mould I’m featuring the neck part is completely open .. I had to edge the mixture very carefully into this part at first, but as it congeals it’s easier to build up a thickness.

close-up of mould being filled

After about 5mins or so (though this will vary with different resins) it can no longer be distributed so easily with the brush .. and it’s very important to stop trying at this point! .. because in doing so one risks separating the now gum like resin from the mould surface. In this state it’s possible though to press it, almost model it, with the fingers. Also at this stage if you want to use the brush again you need to clean it quickly in acetone.

filled halves of mould

I never try to do the two halves of the mould at once, however simple the form is .. most often the quick curing of the resin doesn’t give enough time for this. It is inevitable that the cast is much thicker in the deeper parts, but I’ve always found that if I follow the procedure described even the thin sections end up strong enough. They’ll get an extra covering during the next stage anyway. Resins have a so-called green stage (polyurethane having a longer one than polyester) when the thinner sections of the resin remain quite flexible. This can be taken advantage of .. let’s say it’s been 20-30mins since pouring .. for going round the mould edge with a scalpel or fine wooden modelling tool and peeling away anything that’s crept over the line. If not, the mould halves won’t fit together tightly! Now that they’re ready, the two halves of the hollow cast are going to be joined together from the inside .. by closing the two mould halves together and pouring in just enough resin to fill the seams.

Vaseline between mould halves

Above, I am brushing Vaseline on the remaining silicone surface, but being careful not to get it on the resin .. not so clear in the photo above. Vaselining the ‘seam faces’ (that is, the parts of the mould which come together to form the seam) is not an essential move when using silicone, but I’ve found that it often helps a lot! It provides an extra seal which halts the seepage of resin (this time mixed with a little less Fillite, to make it more liquid) out of the mould. I’ve also found that the Vaseline helps the silicone halves to align better.

For this internal coating I mixed up a small amount of resin and Fillite in the same way as before, but this time 10g part ‘A’, just 7g Fillite and 10g part ‘B’. I poured most of the mixture immediately into one half of the mould, placed the other half of the mould on top, made sure that the mould was secure and then rotated the mould carefully along the axis of the seam line to concentrate resin in this area. Obviously I had to be careful not to tip too far when running the resin close to the open neck part. Basically one has to continue in this fashion, ‘see-sawing’ around the whole seam and back, until one’s fairly certain that the resin has become too thick to move much more. Here it helps to have some of the resin remaining in the cup, as shown below, to indicate how thick it’s become. Another option, for those who have a little less patience, is to accelerate the curing with heat. Below I’ve set up a small heat gun to blow into the mould. I’m holding the mould because it needs to be moved around .. if left static it would get too hot. Once there’s no more obvious movement of the resin I usually leave the mould alone for a while, only demoulding the form once the extra resin in the cup is completely hard to the touch. If you don’t have this as a control, it should generally be safe to demould 1 hour after pouring, whichever brand of polyurethane resin you’re using.

heating resin to quicken curing

Obviously the advantage of being able to make a hollow cast like this is that it is lightweight, while still being strong. It also saves on material. If strength is of particular importance, more than one coating of resin can be applied or strengtheners such as glassfibre matting or scrim can be integrated into the two halves before the mould is put together. This is not a method of speedy mass-production .. it takes considerably more time than pouring a cast .. but manually ‘applying’ the cast in sections, as it were, does ensure that you can make perfect, blemish-free casts every time. If for any reason a solid cast is preferred, it’s easy to fill the hollow casting with more resin .. although it may be better to do this in stages for forms larger than this one because the heat produced by larger amounts of resin could cause tensions during curing which have been known to crack the casting.

removing flashing with scalpel

As I’ve said in the previous post, there’s always a seam to be cleaned up .. but in this event the work was minimal. With polyurethane resin the flashing (as the excess is called) is particularly easy to remove .. but trimming and sanding is made even easier by the addition of Fillite. My preferred method is to scrape with a scalpel, in the direction away from the blade edge, because I find this easier to control.